Seth Thorn

Dr. Seth Thorn is an American violinist whose research encompasses interaction design and philosophical approaches to computational media. He has published in premier journals and top-tier conferences spanning critical theory, music, and human-computer interaction, including Leonardo Music Journal (MIT), Qui Parle (UC Berkeley), ACM TEI, ACM C&C, ACM MOCO, NIME, and ICMC. Seth has performed on violin with the interface he developed, alto.glove, at numerous cross-disciplinary conferences and music festivals, including the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME), the International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction (TEI), the Conference of the Society for Electroacoustic Music in the United States (SEAMUS), the International Computer Music Conference (ICMC), the New York City Electroacoustic Musical Festival (NYCEMF), and the New York City Electroacoustic Improvisation Summit (NYCEIS). Alto.glove has been recognized at the prestigious Guthman Competition for New Musical Instruments at the Georgia Institute of Technology.
Seth holds PhD and MA degrees in Computer Music and Multimedia from Brown University, an MA in German studies from Brown University, an MA in political theory from the Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, and a BA from Northwestern University in philosophy and critical theory. He has also studied music at the Hochschule für Musik und Darstellende Kunst in Frankfurt am Main.

Instructor of Electronic and Digital Audio
Arizona State University
Tempe, United States
Focus area: Sound, Music, Analogue, Digital, Art History, Theory, Philosophy, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, Body, Anatomy, Self, Computer Science, Code, Data, Cultural Practices, Social Practice, STEAM, Pedagogy, Education, Design, Fabrication, Maker Art, Generative Practices, Generative Art, Public Art, Placemaking, Site Specific, Textiles, Materials, Wearables, Electronics, Connected self, Systems, Psychology, Cognitive Studies, Writing, Literature, Poetry, Performance Art, Theater, Dance, Choreography, Culture, Sociology