Governing Board of Directors

The Leonardo/ISAST Board of Directors is a dedicated group of leaders who focus on guiding the organization on nonprofit strategy, policy and governing issues. They include the following:

Marc Hebert, Chair/President
Greg Harper, Treasurer
Gordon Knox, Secretary
Roger F. Malina, Chair Emeritus
Alan Boldon
Nina Czegledy
Ann Dabovich
Joel Slayton
Tami Spector
JD Talasek
Darlene Tong
John Weber

Past Board Members
 

Board Profiles


Marc Hebert

Email: mbhebert@yahoo.com

Marc Hebert is the Chief Operating Officer at Estuate, a global information technology (IT) services company. From 2006–2008 he was the first Chief Marketing Officer for Virtusa Corporation, a publicly traded IT services firm. From 1999–2006, he was Executive Vice President, Marketing and Alliances for Sierra Atlantic, where he was responsible for corporate positioning, lead generation, public relations and partner development. Previously, Hebert was Vice President for Oracle Corporation, where he held several groundbreaking positions: the Chief Information Officer role, Internal Audit, Oracle Manufacturing development, and Worldwide Alliances Technical Services. He is a recognized expert on offshore outsourcing and has appeared on CNN's "Lou Dobbs Tonight," was interviewed in Investors Business Daily, and has been widely quoted in major media publications, including the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Fortune, Financial Times, New York Times and Boston Globe about offshore outsourcing. Hebert received a BS in Experimental Psychology from Harvard University and an MBA from Stanford University. He has served on numerous nonprofit boards, including La Mamelle/ArtCom and the Santa Clara Vanguard.

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Greg Harper

Email: gharper@harperlaw.net

Greg Harper is an attorney and a politician. His formal education consists of a BS in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and BA in Economics, both from the University of Illinois. His graduate work focused on Artificial Intelligence at San Jose State University and culminated with a JD from the University of California at Hastings. He is the Principal of Harper & Associates, a law firm specializing in contract and land use law. Since 2000, Harper has served in the elected political position as Director of the Alameda-Contra Costa County Transit District for Ward 2, representing approximately 300,000 citizens of Berkeley, Emeryville, Oakland and Piedmont, California. Currently he is President of that Board. He is also a member of the Berkeley’s Measure G Global Warming Task Force. His numerous political positions and appointments include the position of Mayor of Emeryville from 1990–1991. Harper is excited about exploring the rarified intersection of art and pure science. His interests are in determining how Leonardo/ISAST might benefit from its more grounding correlative of the intersection of art and applied sciences or engineering. Having served previously as Leonardo/ISAST’s President and Board Chair, he currently serves as Treasurer and Legal Counsel.

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Gordon Knox

Email: gordonknox@gmail.com

Gordon Knox is the Director of the Arizona State University Art Museum. Previously a core collaborator at the Stanford Humanities Lab, Knox developed international projects that connect artists with scientists and technologists to develop contexts that expanded the circulation of ideas and advance social justice. Knox was the founding director of the Civitella Ranieri Foundation in Italy and has advised numerous international residency programs and commission-oriented cultural institutions in Europe, North and South America, Asia and Africa in the areas of fund raising, management, program design and international collaboration. Knox’s interest in the relationship between critical, artistic inquiry and social change grows from his studies in anthropology at the University of California Santa Cruz, Cambridge University and the University of Chicago.

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Roger F. Malina

Email: rmalina@alum.mit.edu

Roger Malina is a physicist, astronomer, distinguished professor at UT Dallas and Associate Director of Arts and Technology. His work focuses on connections among digital technology, science and art. Malina obtained his BS in Physics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1972, and his PhD in Astronomy at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1979. He was Principal Investigator for the NASA Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite at the University of California, Berkeley. Malina is former director of the Observatoire Astronomique de Marseille Provence (OAMP) in Marseille and member of its observational cosmology group, which performs on investigations on the nature of dark matter and dark energy. He is a member of the Mediterranean Institute for Advanced Study (Institut Méditerranéen de Recherches Avancées, IMERA), an institute he helped set up. IMERA aims at contributing to interdisciplinarity and places emphasis on the human dimensions of the sciences. Malina was the founding Chairman of the Leonardo/ISAST Board and since 1982 has served as Executive Editor of the journal Leonardo. He was named Chair Emeritus in 2008. He writes and speaks on the relationship between the arts, sciences and technology.

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Alan Boldon

Email: a.boldon@brighton.ac.uk

Alan Boldon is an artist, curator and academic. He has exhibited throughout Europe and given lectures and keynote addresses throughout the world. Boldon spent many years working on interdisciplinary projects and for 12 years directed an international arts summer school in Luxembourg devoted to exploring interdisciplinary engagement with place. He has a BA in Art and Social Context and an MA in Psychological Aesthetics. Currently, Boldon is Head of Cultural Engagement and Innovation at the University of Brighton where he also held positions as Deputy Head of the School of Arts, Design and Media and Head of Research. Boldon is also the elected 2017–18 Chair of the Leonardo Education and Art Forum (LEAF), a Leonardo working group that promotes the advancement of artistic research and academic scholarship at the intersections of art, science and technology.

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Nina Czegledy

Email: czegledy@interlog.com

Nina Czegledy, artist, curator, educator, works internationally on collaborative art, science and technology projects. The paradigm shifts in arts and science education and practice as well as the changing perception of the human body and its environment inform her projects. She has exhibited and published widely, won awards for her artwork and has instigated, lead and participated in workshops, forums and festivals worldwide. Czegledy has initiated and convened over 20 academic education workshops at international conferences. Her current curatorial project: SPLICE, At the Intersection of Art and Medicine was exhibited in Vancouver (2012), Toronto (2012) and New York (2013). Current collaborative art projects: The Visual Collider touring project, with Marcus Neustetter, South Africa, exhibited in 10 countries on three continents between 2010–2012; Aura, Aurora an audio-visual installation with Bettina Schuelke, Laszlo Kiss was shown at Machfeld Studio Gallery, Vienna (2012), artMuse Festival, Bocholt (2011), Plein Air festival (2010), Budapest. Czegledy is a Senior Fellow, KMDI, University of Toronto; Associate Adjunct Professor Concordia University, Montreal; Senior Fellow, Hungarian University of Fine Arts, Budapest; member of the Leonardo/ISAST Governing Board; International Research Fellow, Intercreate org, New Zealand; Co-organizer of the biannual Solar Circuit Aotearoa New Zealand (SCANZ); Board Member of Subtle Technologies, Toronto, and Year01, Toronto; and contributing editor to Leonardo Electronic Almanac.

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Ann Dabovich

Email: anndabovich@gmail.com

Ann Dabovich joined Goodwill Industries International, Inc., in fall 2016 to create a contributed income program. She is phasing out from the Exploratorium: The Museum of Science, Art and Human Perception, which she joined in 2008 when she signed on to lead the $300M campaign for the move to Piers 15/17 on San Francisco’s Embarcadero in 2013. She has raised approximately $400M in all contributed funding during this time. Dabovich has been involved with both grant making and resource development for cultural organizations since the early 1980s and has helped many prominent organizations fulfill their visions, including facility development projects. She was a fundraiser with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra during the development of the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Hall, and, in 1989, she became the associate director of development for the San Francisco Symphony. Dabovich served as director of development for the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco from 1994–1999 and was the architect of its capital campaign for the renovation of their home in civic center. She has headed philanthropy efforts at an artist residency and a not-for-profit biotech organization. Dabovich holds a BA in art history from the University of Oregon and an MA in not-for-profit arts management for the University of Illinois.

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Joel Slayton

Email: joel@well.com

Joel Slayton is an internationally recognized artist, curator and researcher. He is a professor at San Jose State University where he founded the CADRE Laboratory for New Media, an interdisciplinary academic institute in the Department of Art and Art History. During his time as a Leonardo/ISAST Board Member from 1998–2007, Slayton led the effort to conceive and create the Leonardo MIT Press Book Series, overseeing publication of the first fifteen books in the series. From 1999–2006 Slayton was president of C5 Corporation, a hybrid artwork in the form of a Silicon Valley startup company that focused on information visualization involving large datasets and social networks. From 2008–2016 Slayton served as executive director of ZER01: The Art and Technology Network. Under his leadership ZERO1 built program relationships intersecting cultural, academic and business sectors through four international Biennials of art and technology; the ZERO1 Garage exhibition and events venue in San Jose, CA; and an innovation-challenge-driven Fellowship program. He also led the efforts to realize the American Arts Incubator in collaboration with the U.S. Department of State Educational and Cultural Affairs Bureau, is a senior fellow of the Silicon Valley American Leadership Forum and serves on the Advisory Board of the SETI Artists in Residency Program.

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Tami Spector

Email: spector@usfca.edu

Tami Spector is a Professor of Organic Chemistry at the University of San Francisco (USF). She received her BA from Bard College, her PhD from Dartmouth College, and was a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Minnesota. She has also been a visiting researcher at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the Huntington Library. Trained as a physical organic chemist her scientific work has focused on fluorocarbons, strained ring organics, and the molecular dynamics and free energy calculations of biomolecules. She has also published and presented work on molecular aesthetics, the visual image of chemistry, the intersections of chemistry and contemporary visual art, and nanoaesthetics. In 1997 she was awarded the USF National Endowment for the Humanities Chair for her work on the Molecular Aesthetics of Disease and in 2005 served as the Louis M. Davies Forum Professor for the course The Material Body: Medicine and Aesthetics in American Culture. She previously served as a guest editor for the journals Foundations of Chemistry and HYLE: International Journal for the Philosophy of Chemistry, co-curated “Chemistry in Art: A Virtual Exhibition” and currently serves on the Leonardo/ISAST Governing and Editorial Boards, co-hosts the San Francisco–based Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous (LASER) series, and serves as the co-editor of an on-going special section on “Art and Atoms” in the Leonardo journal and is the editor of the recently published e-book of the same name.

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JD Talasek

Email: talasek@gmail.com

JD Talasek is the director of Cultural Programs of the National Academy of Sciences (CPNAS), Washington, D.C., which is focused on the exploration of the intersections among science, medicine, technology and visual culture. Talasek is creator and moderator of a regular salon called DASER (DC Art Science Evening Rendezvous) held at the NAS and also serves as the chair of the Leonardo Education and Art Forum (LEAF). Additionally, he serves on the Contemporary Art and Science Committee (CASC) at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and is the art advisor for Issues in Science and Technology Magazine (jointly published by the National Academies, University of Texas at Dallas and Arizona State University). Talasek was the creator and organizer of two international online symposia on Visual Culture and Bioscience (2007) and Visual Culture and Evolution (2010). He has taught at the University of Delaware and Essex and Howard Community Colleges. Talasek has curated several exhibitions at the National Academy of Sciences, including: Imagining Deep Time; Visionary Anatomies; Absorption + Transmission: Work by Mike and Doug Starn; and Cycloids: Paintings by Michael Schultheis. At the University of Delaware, he organized and curated Observations in an Occupied Wilderness: Photographs by Terry Falke; and LightBox: The Visual AIDS Archive Project. He holds a BS in Photography from East Texas State University, an MFA in Studio Arts from the University of Delaware, an MA in Museum Studies from the University of Leicester.

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Darlene Tong

Email: dtong@sfsu.edu

Darlene Tong is Head of Information, Research & Instructional Services at San Francisco State University. She is the Library subject liaison for the University’s art, architecture and design programs. A prolific writer, Tong has presented material on archiving new art documentation and has written about alternative art and multicultural art research. Tong contributed to the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art’s God Only Knows Who the Audience Is exhibition, panel presentation, and catalog in 2011. Tong is a contributor to the newly published book entitled Artist Run Spaces: Non Profit Collective Organizations in the 1960s & 1970s, (Gabriele Detterer and Maurizio Nanucci, eds.), published by JRP/Ringier in January 2013. In addition to serving on the Leonardo/ISAST Board, Tong also serves on the Board of Directors of La Mamelle/Art Com, a nonprofit artist organization that supported alternative art and new art technologies, active from 1975–1997. She prepared the La Mamelle/Art Com Archives that are currently housed at Stanford University.

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John Weber

Email: weberj@ucsc.edu

John S. Weber is the Founding Director of the Institute of the Arts and Sciences at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and an adjunct faculty member in the Division of the Arts. Conceived as more than a museum, the new Institute is designed to function as an intellectual hub for visiting faculty, UCSC faculty, and artists, scientists and humanists-in-residence, as well as provide space for site-specific installations, seminars, events, and hands-on research. Weber was formerly the Dayton Director of the Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, an interdisciplinary museum opened in 2000. At the Tang he supervised all operations and staff, and organized exhibitions. From 1993–2004, he was the Curator of Education and Public Programs at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where he spear-headed the architectural design and program of SFMOMA’s Koret Visitor Education Center, founded the museum’s interactive educational technologies program, and co-curated exhibitions. From 1987–1993 Weber served as curator of contemporary art at the Portland Art Museum in Oregon. Weber holds a BA from Reed College (1978), and an MFA from the University of California, San Diego (1984), where he began his career as a studio artist. He has taught at Skidmore College, the San Francisco Art Institute, Mills College, the University of Washington, and the Pacific Northwest College of Art.

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Past Board Members

Martin Anderson
Jeffrey Babcock
Mark Beam
Mina Bissell
Anne Brooks-Pfister
Rosa Casarez-Levison
Jim Crutchfeild
Theodosia Ferguson
Penny Finnie
Rich Gold
Michael Joaquin Grey
John Hearst
Melinda Klayman
Larry Larson
Lynn Hershman-Leeson
Curtis Karnow
Melinda Klayman
Marjorie Duckworth Malina
Christine Maxwell
Robert Maxwell
Samuel Okoshken
Greg Niemeyer
Ed Payne
Anne Brooks Pfister
Sonya Rapoport
Beverly Reiser
Mark Resch
Marci Reichelstein
Lord Eric Roll
Piero Scaruffi
Christian Simm
Joel Slayton
Marcia Tanner
Meredith Tromble
Aimee Tsao
Makepeace Tsao
Barbara Lee Williams
Richard Wilson
Stephen Wilson
 

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In Memoriam

Sonya Rapoport

Sonya Rapoport was widely recognized as a pioneering digital artist whose 65-year career bridges the gap between painting and interactive conceptual art. Her prolific interdisciplinary art practice combined her extensive research in the sciences and humanities with highly personal subject matter. Rapoport received a BA in Labor Economics from New York University in 1946 and an MA in Art from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1949. Her early career as a painter of figurative and abstract-expressionist work culminated in a prestigious solo exhibition at the Legion of Honor in 1963. In 1976 she began creating drawings on computer printouts, eventually leading to her reinvention as a digital artist. She became an integral part of a small community of artists experimenting with early computer technology, often creating interactive installations that involved the gathering, processing and representing of data by computer output. Her work was presented in over 50 national and international solo and retrospective exhibitions during her career. Her work has been discussed in several Leonardo journal articles and books, as well as in numerous other publications. In 2012, Pairing of Polarities: The Life and Art of Sonya Rapoport, edited by Terri Cohn, was published by Heyday. In 2014, the Bancroft Library of Western Americana at UC Berkeley acquired the archives of her life’s work. The Sonya Rapoport Legacy Trust was founded in 2015 to preserve her art and promote appreciation of her work. Sonya passed away in June 2015.

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In Memoriam

Stephen Wilson

Stephen Wilson was a San Francisco author, artist and professor who explored the cultural implications of emerging technologies such as biosensors, gps, and artificial intelligence. His award-winning interactive installations and performances have been shown internationally in galleries and SIGGRAPH, CHI, NCGA, Ars Electronica and V2 art shows. He was an investigator in NSF projects and artist in residence at various think tanks including Xerox PARC. He published numerous articles and books, including Information Arts: Intersections of Art, Science and Technology (MIT Press/Leonardo Books, 2001). He directed the Conceptual/Information Arts Program at San Francisco State University, which prepares artists to work at the frontiers of research. Stephen passed away in January 2011. Visit his website at http://userwww.sfsu.edu/~swilson/.

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In Memoriam

Marjorie Duckworth Malina

Marjorie Duckworth Malina was born on 28 April 1918 in Elslack, Yorkshire, England. The daughter of John James Duckworth and Mary Anne Bolton, she was the youngest of four; her sisters were Thyra, Annie and Mary. She attended the University of London, obtaining a bachelor's degree in 1939. She trained in accountancy while working in her father's textile company, JJ Duckworth Ltd. During World War II she served in the Women's Auxiliary Corps, reaching the rank of captain, and with the antiaircraft batteries operated by women that helped defend Britain during the war. Shortly after the war she applied to work at UNESCO, a newly founded organization, after hearing a radio broadcast by Julian Huxley, and was hired in the personnel department in 1947. There she met Frank Malina, then Deputy Director for Science of UNESCO, and they married in 1949. Frank and Marjorie bought a house in Boulogne Bellancourt and raised two sons, Roger and Alan. The Malina home was the birthplace of the journal Leonardo and a center of art-science debate in Paris in the 1950s and 1960s. It was also the studio where Frank Malina worked as a pioneer in the kinetic art movement. The steady flow of guests and visitors included astronautical pioneers, artists and scholars, including Jacob Bronowski, Frank Popper, Academician Sedov, Roy Ascott and Leonardo editorial board members. Numerous friends and colleagues enjoyed the hospitality of Marjorie Duckworth Malina. She worked tirelessly for the success of the Leonardo project and was an ardent defender of the ideals of international collaboration. Marjorie passed away in the spring of 2006. Donations to Leonardo/ISAST in memory of Marjorie Malina are gratefully accepted.

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In Memoriam

Barbara Lee Williams

Barbara Lee Williams was a San Francisco Bay Area art critic and essayist specializing in 20th-century artists and ethics. A former curator and educator, she wrote regularly for San Francisco Sidewalk, Microsoft's Bay Area entertainment guide; her work has also appeared in The Threepenny Review, San Francisco Magazine, The San Francisco Chronicle, Christian Science Monitor and literary publications. She served on the Board of Directors of Leonardo/ISAST since 1997 and was the Vice-Chairman of the Board and head of the Leonardo Awards Program Committee. She also contributed dialogues on electronic arts to Leonardo Digital Reviews. Williams passed away in March 2002.

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In Memoriam

Rich Gold

Rich Gold was a composer, cartoonist and researcher who in the 1970s co-founded the League of Automatic Music Composers, the first network computer band. As an internationally known artist he invented the field of Algorithmic Symbolism, an example of which, "The Party Planner," was featured in Scientific American. He was head of the sound and music department of Sega USA's coin-op video game division and the inventor of the award winning "Little Computer People" (Activision), the first fully autonomous computerized person one could buy. For 5 years he headed the electronic and computer toy research group at Mattel Toys and was the manager of the Mattel PowerGlove, among other interactive toys. He also worked on Captain Power, the first interactive broadcast TV show and ICVD, an early CD-based video system. After working as a consultant in Virtual Reality he joined Xerox PARC, where he was a researcher in Ubiquitous Computing, the study of invisible, embedded and tacit computation. He was a co-designer of the PARC Tab, helped launch the successful LiveBoard project, and was the inventor or co-inventor on 10 patents. In 1992 he created and ran for ten years the PARC artist-in-residence program (PAIR), which pairs fine artists and scientists together based on shared technologies (Art and Innovation, MIT Press, describes the project). He was the manager of a multi-disciplinary laboratory, RED (Research in Experimental Documents), which looks at the creation of new document genres by merging art, design, science and engineering. His particular area of study was in corporate identity within new genres and "living documents" (ever changing documents deeply embedded in ever changing cultures). Gold was a Fellow at The World Economic Forum and as an Applied Cartoonist gave talks all over the world on his work, the pragmatics of knowledge art and on contemporary innovation. His passion was the merging of art, science, design and engineering. Gold passed away in January 2003.

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