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Leonardo

LEON 51.4 Advertising Positions: Data Portraiture as Aesthetic Critique

Advertising Positions integrates 3D scanning, motion capture, novel image mapping algorithms and custom animation to create data portraits from the advertisements served by online trackers. Project volunteers use bespoke software to harvest the ads they receive over months of browsing. When enough ads have been collected, the volunteer is interviewed, 3D scanned and motion captured. Each ad is then mapped to a single polygon on the textured skin of their virtual avatar. Outcomes have been displayed as 2D/3D images, animations and interactive installations.

LEON 51.4 Entropy and FatFinger: Challenging the Compulsiveness of Code with Programmatic Anti-Styles

Coding, the translating of human intent into logical steps, reinforces a compulsive way of thinking, as described in Joseph Weitzenbaum’s “Science and the Compulsive Programmer” (1976). Two projects by the author, Entropy (2010) and FatFinger (2017), challenge this by encouraging gestural approaches to code. In the Entropy programming language, data becomes slightly more approximate each time it is used, drifting from its original values, forcing programmers to be less precise.

LEON 51.4 CASTING: Site-Specific Projective Mapping Installations

This paper investigates CASTING, Yiyung Kang’s site-specific projection mapping installation at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, U.K., and the acquisition of the piece by the V&A in the following year. It identifies how CASTING developed distinctive properties in the field of projected moving-image installation artworks and how these novel characteristics were reflected in the acquisition by the V&A.

LEON 51.4 Here and Now: Indigenous Canadian Perspectives and New Media in Works bu Ruben Komangpik, Kent Monkman and Adrian Duke

Examining the use of new media in works by Ruben Komangapik, Kent Monkman and the Wikiup Indigenous Knowledge Network reveals the diverse ways in which technologies are used to disrupt linear time and Western visions of history. New media works challenge those misleading stories that have been told about Canada’s indigenous peoples and assert indigenous presence in both the digital and physical landscape. These artists employ QR codes, video and augmented reality to push artistic boundaries and create representations of the past and present.

LEON 51.4 Robotype: Studies of Kinetic Typography by Robot Display for Expressing Letters, Time and Movement

Humans use letters, which are two-dimensional static symbols, for communication. Writing these letters requires body movement as well as spending a certain amount of time; therefore, it can be demonstrated that a letter is a trajectory of movement and time. Based on this notion, the author conducted studies regarding multidimensional kinetic typography, primarily using robots to display a letter and visualize its time and movement simultaneously.

LEON 51.4 Data Materialization: A Hybrid Process of Crafting a Teapot

Data materialization is a workflow developed to create 3D objects from data-informed designs. Building upon traditional metalwork and craft, and new technology’s data visualization with generative art, this workflow expresses conceptually relevant data through 3D forms which are fabricated in traditional media. The process allows for the subtle application of data in visual art, allowing the aesthetic allure of the art object or installation to inspire intellectual intrigue.

LEON 51.4 Digital Heritage: Bringing New Life to the Montreux Jazz Festival's Audio-Visual Archives with Immersive Installations

To revive the Montreux Jazz Festival’s archival live-concert footage, three immersive installations were designed using three different principles of augmentation, physicality and interaction. The primary aim was to engage the user in a new relationship with digitized heritage. Audience observations indicated a strong emotional connection to the content, the artist and the crowd, as well as the development of new social interactions.

LEON 51.4 Alienating the Familiar with CGI: A Recipe for Making a Full CGI Art House Animated Feature

This paper is an exploration of the processes used and ideas behind an animated full CGI feature film project that attempts to reach blockbuster production values, while retaining Art House sensibilities. It examines methods used to achieve these production values in an academic production environment and ways costs can be minimized while high quality levels are retained. It also examines the film’s status as an Art House project, by comparing its narrative design and use of symbolism to existing works of Art House cinema.

LEON 51.4 Holojam in Wonderland: Immersive Mixed Reality Theater

Holojam in Wonderland is a prototype of a new type of performance activity, “Immersive Mixed Reality Theater” (IMRT). With unique and novel properties possessed by neither cinema nor traditional theater, IMRT promises exciting new expressive possibilities for multi-user, participatory, immersive digital narratives. The authors describe the piece, the technology used to create it and some of the key aesthetic choices and takeaways.

LEON 51.4 Diastrophisms: Visual and Sound Assembly in Remembrance of an Earthquake

Diastrophisms is a sound installation with a modular system that sends images through rhythmic patterns. It is build on a set of debris from the Alto Rio building that was destroyed by the 27F earthquake in 2010 in Chile. Diastrophisms explores poetical, critical and political crossings between technology and matter in order to raise questions about the relationship between human beings and nature, to consider the construction of memory in a community by questioning the notion of monument, and to imagine new forms of communication in times of crisis.