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Leonardo

Volume 28, No. 2 (1995)

Issue Contents

April/May 1995

Leonardo is a print journal, edited by Leonardo/the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology, and published by the MIT Press. Subscriptions and individual issues can be ordered from the MIT Press.

TO ORDER


GATEWAY

by JOHN CHALMERS, GYORGY DARVAS, DONALD HOUSE, ROGER F. MALINA, ESTUDIO MILLE, DENES NAGY, IRINA L. VANECHKINA


THE LEONARDO GALLERY

by KATHLEEN CHMELEWSKI, NAN GOGGIN, JOSEPH SQUIER, KATHLEEN H. RUIZ, JEFF MURPHY, MARTINA LOPEZ, GLORIA DEFILIPPS BRUSH, MICHAEL ENSDORF, STEPHEN GOLDING, REBECA BOLLINGER


ARTISTS' ARTICLES

Audio Jackets and Other Electroacoustic Clothes

by BENOIT MAUBREY

ABSTRACT
The author discusses his performance pieces involving electroacoustic clothes---combinations of various thematic articles of clothing and sound equipment---worn by performers who interact with the sounds coming from their apparel and the public.


She Loves It, She Loves It Not: Women and Technology, an Interactive CD-ROM

by CHRISTINE TAMBLYN

ABSTRACT
She Loves It, She Loves It Not: Women and Technology is an interactive CD-ROM (compact disc--read only memory) recently completed by the author in collaboration with Marjorie Franklin and Paul Tompkins. Key concepts from research on the topic of women and technology that informed the content of the project are highlighted in this article. The CD-ROM contains texts, sound, movie clips and images about women's use of technology in the past, present and future. It utilizes methodologies derived from academic essay writing and documentary film production. Both the form and the content of the work demonstrate how technology might adapt to female learning proclivities and female culture.


GENERAL ARTICLES

Semiotic Variety in Digital Imagery: The Case of Maxwell's Demon

by KEVIN COOK

ABSTRACT
A great deal of semiotic variety exists within digital video productions. Consequently, many perspectives should be considered in their analysis, not only those that focus on the digital nature of their images. To demonstrate the importance of this thesis, several semiotic and critical issues relative to video and art are identified and discussed in the context of digital imaging, truth-falsehood production and Maxwell's Demon, a 2D (two-dimensional) computer-animation work by artist James Duesing.


Programmed Graphics in Computer Art and Animation

by MIKE KING

ABSTRACT
In the early days of computer graphics, artists had to learn programming in order to use the new technology. Today, when such a wide range of software packages runs on affordable hardware, one might ask why artists should continue to learn to program. While this question has been considered for many years, today even experienced artists are looking at the sophistication and affordability of current software and realizing that much of their programming efforts could amount to a proverbial reinvention of the wheel. The author considers the continuing rationale for learning to program, taking into account the visual outcomes related to images generated by programming, looking at some practicing artists who use programming in their work and describing his own Windows- based explorations.


Intuitive Three-Dimensional Sketching in Digital Space: The Synthesis of the Genetic Code for Buildings/Organisms

by KAS OOSTERHUIS

ABSTRACT
The author views buildings and the human-made environment as synthetic organisms, living lives that execute the will of their genetic codes. The intuitive three-dimensional (3D) sketch in the digital space of the computer acts as the generator for the future shape of a building. The author describes a series of workshops in which the intuitive 3D sketch forms the descriptive basis for the genetic code of the architecture of future buildings/organisms. He believes that when the creative potential of the intuitive 3D sketch is fully exploited, architecture can be freed from its traditional constraints. It will become more fluid and complex in appearance and will reach a higher level of performance as a result.


Color-Encoded Music Scores: What Visual Communication Can Do for Music Reading

by CELSO WILMER




Crisscrossing the Interface: The Design, Display and Evaluation of an Interactive Computer Exhibit

by PAUL ZELEVANSKY

ABSTRACT
The author discusses the conceptual design process that led to the creation of a computer exhibit at the New York Hall of Science, a "hands-on" science museum in Queens, New York. His discussion incorporates critical consideration of some of the broader pedagogical, social and philosophical issues that both inform and have impact on the use and abuse of interactive exhibits in public spaces.



SOLART GLOBAL NETWORK

The SolArt Global Network '95: Artworks for the Solar Age

by JURGEN CLAUS


Perspectives and Prejudices about Some Major Issues

by PAUL MACCREADY


Solar Energy Is the Energy

by HERMANN SCHEER


Secrets of the Sun in Los Angeles

by PETER ERSKINE


DOCUMENT

THE NEW YORK INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS: The Performing and Visual Arts and New Technologies Seminars


ABSTRACTS

Wire-Brush Electrographic Art

by MATE GYULA


Numerical Relativity: On the Fallibility of Computers

by JEAN-FRANCOIS COLONNA






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